Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversations, Ep. 02

by Elella Daba

In this installment of Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversations, Kuwee, Elella and Ayantu continue exploring the theme of silencing in general and the silencing of women’s voices in particular. The purpose of this segment is to lay out the general framework informing this project and to clarify the intentions of the speakers.

We invite listeners to share their perspectives on this theme.


Aaddee Kuwee Kumsa is a lifelong activist, former political prisoner and social work scholar who has spent a lifetime thinking and writing about issues of liberation within a local and global context.

Ayantu Ayana is a researcher and organizer interested in the theoretical and practical processes of building inclusive transnational and intersectional grassroots movements. She is co-founder and producer at Odaacity, a podcast committed to promoting meaningful conversations regarding sociopolitical affairs of the Horn of Africa.

Elella Daba has always been curious about the role of Oromo women in their community, both at home and abroad. She hopes that this Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversation project will help in building multiple platforms where Oromo women’s voices are fully heard.

 

Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversations, Ep. 01

by Elella Daba

This conversation was recorded during a preliminary meeting between Aaddee Kuwee Kumsa, Ayantu Ayana and I. We recorded our conversation in order to prepare and reflect on the issues we would like to address in the Oromo community both at home and abroad, based on our experiences and perspectives.

Upon listening to the recorded meeting, we felt that it would be ideal to release it as a form of introduction to herald the beginning of a series of conversations we would like to have. Our hope is that having in-depth and candid conversations among Oromo women will help in building multiple platforms where their voices are fully heard.

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As we start our Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversations, it is our sincerest hope you will join us in this journey!

Check out the link below:


Aaddee Kuwee Kumsa is a lifelong activist, former political prisoner and social work scholar who has spent a lifetime thinking and writing about issues of liberation within a local and global context.

Ayantu Ayana is a researcher and organizer interested in the theoretical and practical processes of building inclusive transnational and intersectional grassroots movements. She is co-founder and producer at Odaacity, a podcast committed to promoting meaningful conversations regarding sociopolitical affairs of the Horn of Africa.

Elella Daba has always been curious about the role of Oromo women in their community, both at home and abroad. She hopes that this Intergenerational Siiqqee Conversation project will help in building multiple platforms where Oromo women’s voices are fully heard.

 

Siiqqee as a Form of Resistance

“The irony is that when Oromo men trample on the rights of Oromo women, it is not considered a betrayal of the national cause. Thus Oromo women are told to “bear it” or “swallow it” and put off the struggle against sexism until after national liberation. Despite their denigration, however, Oromo women in Oromia and in the Oromo diaspora are stepping up their struggle against sexism. Some women in Oromia have formed an organization under the name of siiqqee which underlines the fight against gender oppression. Women like Likkee Waldee and Maymune Sherif have continued their revolutionary activism even in exile; they cry out for the necessity of multifarious Oromo women’s organizations and a wider scale of consciousness-raising education. Obviously gender and national consciousness assists Oromo women to correct the distorted images and prepares them for the struggle of true liberation.”

– Aaddee Kuwee Kumsa, “Oromo Women and the Oromo National Movement: Dilemmas, Problems and Prospects for True Liberation” from the text “Oromo Nationalism and the Ethiopian Discourse: The Search for Freedom and Democracy”